Advisory students play with light painting


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Daniel McCabe and Wes Gonzalez's freshman advisory students began playing with light painting techniques, led by student teacher Aaron Viramontes.

Light painting, or light drawing, is a photographic technique in which exposures are made by moving a hand-held light source while taking a long exposure photograph, either to illuminate a subject or to shine a point of light directly at the camera.

Traditional light painting uses handheld lights to selectively illuminate or color parts of the subject or scene. Light painting requires a slow shutter speed, usually at least a second in duration. Light painting can take on the characteristics of a traditional painter.

Light paintings can be created using a webcam. The painted image can already be seen while drawing by using a monitor or projector. Another technique is the projection of images on to irregular surfaces (such as faces or buildings), in effect "painting" them with light. A photograph or other fixed portrayal of the resulting image is then made.

In 1949 Pablo Picasso was visited by Gjon Mili, a photographer and lighting innovator, who introduced Picasso to his photographs of ice skaters with lights attached to their skates. Immediately Picasso started making images in the air with a small flashlight in a dark room. This series of photos became known as Picasso's "light drawings." Of these photos, the most celebrated and famous is known as "Picasso draws a Centaur."

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...to be continued this Friday...

The continuation..........

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